Stuck with IDE speeds on SSD

Discussion in 'Tech Support' started by azo, Dec 31, 2014.

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  1. azo

    azo ɐllᴉzpoƃ

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    So as I posted in the last purchase topic, I got this SanDisk SSD as a Christmas present. It was on sale at the time and it seemed like a good deal, which it was. I always wanted to put an SSD in my old laptop, and this seemed like a good opportunity to do so.

    I installed the drive yesterday, together with a fresh Windows 7 installation. Don't ask me why it's not Windows 8.1, I just had the USB ready with W7, so I thought it didn't matter that much anyway.

    The drive itself works fine, I can definitely feel a performance increase compared to the old 2.5" 5400RPM 8MB drive. However, it's not as good as it could be. The drive could be 10x faster, but I am stuck on IDE settings in BIOS, because the motherboard does not support AHCI mode. This is very weird, because the laptop isn't that old. I actually flashed BIOS today to the newest version available and I can still see no AHCI option there. Only IDE.

    [​IMG]

    For the record, my 840 EVO goes up to 580MB/sec in sequential writes, so it's quite a loss.

    I am just posting this simply as a rant. As a rant to myself for not checking out this before. But to be honest, I did not expect it to end like this. I couldn't even think it would not be fully supported.

    The laptop is Asus X61SL and it uses a F50 model motherboard. I am just posting this for people who have the same model and are thinking of slightly extending its life cycle. Be warned. And to other people, check if your oldie can actually cope with it.

    Thoughts? Ideas? They are welcome.
     
  2. Aztlan

    Aztlan Ocelotl Yolotl

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    Did you tried the SSD in another system to check if the problem is not from the SSD itself?
     
  3. azo

    azo ɐllᴉzpoƃ

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    Technically, there is no problem. The motherboard just doesn't have the necessary controller (AHCI) and therefore does not allow SSD to perform to its full speed.
     
  4. Aztlan

    Aztlan Ocelotl Yolotl

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    The laptop model you have was initially released back in 2009
    back then SSDs were recently introduced and cost as much as that system alone.

    is just the unfortunate progress of technology. I remember the same thing happened with IDE interface drives, IDE speeds progressed from 16, 33, 66, 100 to 133 MB/s; newer drives were speed limited or didn't work at all with older IDE controllers
     
  5. azo

    azo ɐllᴉzpoƃ

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    Now I have a plan to get rid of this thing and get myself a cheap, but new laptop :D.
     
  6. azo

    azo ɐllᴉzpoƃ

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    Okay, I thought I post a follow up.

    After doing some research and doing various benchmarks on different laptops that I can get my hands on, I found out that even in IDE mode speeds should not be that slow. People around the world claim speeds well over 200MB/sec (read/write) without AHCI mode enabled. Furthermore, there are tests available which clearly show only a very marginal speed advantage of AHCI mode. I did the same tests on Sony VAIO E series laptop and can confirm it is true. With or without AHCI, speeds should not be so slow. So, I figured there mast must be something wrong with the laptop itself.

    Long story short, recently I had a chance to get my hands on an identical laptop.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I immediately swapped out the drive with my SSD and did the same CrystalDisk benchmark. Same SSD in different laptops. Here are the results.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    As you can see, the laptop itself is fine, it's not damaged and the motherboard is working as it should.

    Bottom line is - this particular laptop model SUCKS balls and for some stupid reason Asus (or mobo manufacturer) decided to artificially cripple this fucker by capping the transfer speed. Why did they do that, I have no idea.

    I don't really give a damn at this point, I barely use the thing anyway. All I wanted is some closure, if you will, and now I can sleep better. As crazy as this sounds :D.

    The case is closed.

    /Sherlock's out
     
  7. Aztlan

    Aztlan Ocelotl Yolotl

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    It all comes down to the SATA controller used between laptops.
    I am noticing Asus using component manufacturers I never heard before in their products
     
  8. azo

    azo ɐllᴉzpoƃ

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    Are they still doing it? Because this is an old model, so I thought maybe they had been doing it in the past only.
     
  9. Aztlan

    Aztlan Ocelotl Yolotl

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    It seems that way. The x99 board I have has extra SATA ports being supported by an Asmedia controller. I will stick to using the native Intel SATA ports.
     
  10. azo

    azo ɐllᴉzpoƃ

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    Holy shit, they even do it on high end $250-300 parts?!

    The fuck, Asus? o_O
     
  11. Aztlan

    Aztlan Ocelotl Yolotl

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    apparently Asmedia is subsidiary of Asustek, parent company of Asus.
    still, their controllers are around 20 percent slower than native Intel ports
     

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